Phenological moments

Budding, flowering, fruit setting, maturing...

Phenological moments

Stress factors coincide with stages such as embriogenic development, budding, flowering, fruit setting and maturing

From the germination of the seed through to the senescence phase, the plant develops vegetatively and reproduces, going through a series of stages that make up its biological cycle. This development is marked by a series of physiological and metabolic changes which enable the plant to grow and differentiate its different structures, according to the phenological moment they are at. 

These moments of change are normally critical for the plant as regards its susceptibility to any type of variation in the optimum development conditions. The stress factors coincide with stages such as embriogenic development, budding, flowering, fruit setting and maturing in which the plant is more sensitive due to the complex inner changes it is undergoing. Entry into these various phases is genetically determined and depends on the environmental conditions. 

The common signal of the start of each process is a change in the endogenous hormone content, which follows changes in the internal distribution of the plant's metabolites. These sensitive phases also coincide with the growth stages critical to achieving optimum production.